“Penny Rug” Magnets

After a great day perusing my favorite antique/country shop, I was inspired to do a little crafting. I picked up a new penny rug table runner, and it got me thinking about how much I love the colors and patterns of penny rugs. I have never been able to sew, so I thought I’d try my hand at painting them!

DSC_0007

Here is my new runner that was the inspiration. I love this color combo!

DSC_0005

These are the wooden discs I used. They are the same ones I use for my snowman and pumpkin face pins & magnets. You can get them at any craft store.

DSC_0007

Paint them your base color. I used acrylics.

DSC_0014

Then paint in your rings of color! I winged it and painted the circles by hand, but a stencil would have been handy. I’m even thinking of trying it again using foam stamps.

DSC_0015

DSC_0016

The next step seems easy in theory, but was actually quite challenging. I’m talking about the little “stitches.” Here’s my trial and error photo. First I tried drawing them on with a paint pen (not pictured), but I can never get those stupid pens to work right. Then I tried painting them on with a fine tipped paint brush (left). Next, I tried drawing them on with a fine tipped Sharpie marker (middle). Lastly, I used a regular sized Sharpie marker (right). I decided to go with the latter. I like the thicker look of the stitches.

DSC_0018

The Sharpie works great at first, but as you continue to draw, the marker almost seems to run out. I think it’s because it doesn’t work well on the painted surface. You might need a couple Sharpies to make it through.

DSC_0019

After they dried, I glued small magnets on the back. Here they are all finished. I had a few casualties…some came out too messy and/or uneven. It’s going to take some practice I think. Overall I think they’re kinda cool.

DSC_0030

I am definitely going to make more of these after I perfect my technique. I have tons of enamel ware pots and pans hanging on the walls at my co-op, which work great as magnet displays. Go Google Penny Rugs right now and see all the beautiful color combinations out there! It’s so inspiring! 🙂

Adding a Primitive Fall Look to Boring Ol’ Candles

Sometimes things that I think are really cute, will sit in my booth for years, and won’t sell. For example, I bought some small candles years ago, that came in awesome faux white enamel tubs and had a real farmhouse look to them. Though they’re old, they still smell awesome and I am not giving up on them! I have since made them over a few times, and I am hoping my new Fall spin on them will help them move off the shelves. Here’s the new country look and the how-to!

DSC_0028

Originally I tried to sell them as is, for like $3 a piece. Good deal, so I thought, but no one wanted them! 😦 Then as Christmas time came around, I packed them up in plastic bags, tied them with homespun, and added a cute rustic tag, for gift giving. I sold a few, but still have about 6 left. Here’s the “before.”

DSC_0001

My first step in making them over was to “primify” them. I put the broiler on and CAREFULLY watched them for about 1 minute while the tops softened up and smoothed out. After years of sitting around, the wax gets little scratches and nicks, so this process makes them look brand new again. I then shook on some ground cinnamon and let them cool. It gives them a rustic, dusty look, and of course smells great too! Please don’t burn your house down doing this. Don’t leave them unattended and please, be careful people!!!

DSC_0002

My first thought was to tie the burlap over the top and tie off with some twine. I guess I was envisioning more of a cheesecloth look, where you could see and smell the candle better. This just looked dumb. LOL. It also covered my cute, newly dusted candle tops that look so perfectly primitive!

DSC_0007

Take two. I used a plate as a guide to trace out circles of burlap that would fold up around the tubs, from the bottom.  This idea would look great on small jar candles (such as those in short, fat mason jars), so don’t worry if you love the look but can’t find these exact candles! Any jar candle would work!

DSC_0010 DSC_0011

Put a ring of hot glue on the bottom of the jar candle and place on burlap. Then, using tiny dabs of hot glue, fold up the edges and create a taco-shell look. This will make it easier to tie on the twine.

DSC_0016 DSC_0017

Tie it around once or twice and add more dabs of hot glue to hold up your burlap. I also trimmed and frayed the edges of my burlap during this part.

DSC_0018

For a little accent, I took a sprig of pip berries I had lying around and pulled off two sprigs for each candle.

DSC_0008

I curled up the ends of the sprigs by wrapping them around a little paint brush handle. Then I tied them on using the excess twine and finished it off with a little bow.

DSC_0022

I think I will throw in a free mason jar tag with each candle since they’d made nice Fall gifts. I got these mason jar tags at Target…8 for $1! I love them!

DSC_0024

They have a cool “scarecrow” feel with the frayed burlap. They’d be nice for any primitive home decor but will be especially nice for Fall time I think.

DSC_0026

My helper Fred takes a little snooze while I clean up. What a bum!

DSC_0027

Like I said, this look would be easy to create on regular jar candles as well. The cinnamon dusting is a super easy way to make something look “prim” too! What are your thoughts on the finished project? Anything you’d do differently? 🙂

Mason Jar Bird Feeder

If you’re anything like me, you have a Pinterest board full of craft projects that you want to try but never seem to get around to! One of them is this adorable mason jar bird feeder. Last weekend, I spotted this little metal chicken feeder base for only $4 at Tractor Supply. This is literally the easiest, quickest project ever. You need virtually no crafty skills to make this and it came out so cute! All you need is the chicken feeder (any country supply store) a mason jar (I had on hand) and some twine or wire to hang it up.

DSC_0628

The mason jar screws right into the feeder. I think any standard jar will fit. I happened to pick up these little galvanized metal stars at Target in the $1 bin recently, and they matched the feeder base perfectly. You could decorate it however you want ~ that is the beauty of simple projects like this.

DSC_0630

The only semi-challenge was devising a way to hang it up. I’m not about to start breaking out diamond drill bits and try to drill a hole in the glass. I have seen wire wrapped around the jar for hanging, which seems easy. I decided to use twine ($1 store or Walmart) to create the hanger.

DSC_0633

First, I braided 3 strands of twine to make it a little thicker and more durable. It’s hard to describe how I knotted it, so here’s a little graphic of how I created the twine hanger.

knots

I hung the little stars wind-chime style from the top of the hanger. I love that the metal stars match the metal feeder base.

DSC_0637

For a 5 minute, $5 project, I love it! What a great craft fair item to make a sell at Spring/Summer shows. You could jazz them all up and sell for at least $12-$15 each. I want to make some for my booth at The Carriage Place; I’ll let you know how they sell!

DSC_0641

Primitive Grubby Jar Candles

After seeing these types of “grubby” jar candles on Pinterest for many years, I finally got around to trying them myself. Though it was a very long process, they came out so cute and perfectly primitive! There are many tutorials out there on grubby jars, but they are all pretty much the same: coffee grounds and white glue. You can do mason jars or any type of jar candle…it’s the perfect accent for any country or rustic home.

DSC_0534 2

I started with this set of 12 small jar candles from Walmart. They cost around $6, so profitability on these should be pretty good.

DSC_0534

I made up a mixture of about 2/3 coffee grounds to 1/3 cinnamon. Both can be bought at the dollar store for this project. I used matte Mod Podge, but now that it’s all said and done, I would probably use regular white glue because it’s a lot cheaper. I ended up using almost this whole jar on 12 little candles.

DSC_0536 2

Paint on the glass jars with glue and roll in your coffee/cinnamon mixture.

DSC_0538

DSC_0539

Set them aside to dry. It takes a good 24 hours for them to dry thoroughly.

DSC_0541 2

Once dry, gently tap them on the counter to get off any loose coffee/cinnamon grounds. Then apply another coat of glue to seal it. Be prepared…this part is messy! Don’t worry if more grounds come off because you can always do a second coat.

DSC_0530

Set aside to dry again. Another 24 hours. Ugh…I hate waiting!

DSC_0533

Here they are after they are dried. With just one coat, most of the surface was covered, but there were still a few spots where the glass showed through. I decided to do a second coating of the coffee/cinnamon. Looking back, I think I would just stick with one coat. They’re eventually going to be embellished with homespun fabric or burlap, which will cover up any thin areas. It’s up to you how many coats you do, based on the look you’re going for.

DSC_0535

Another little tip: before you start, put a small piece of paper towel over the wax of your candle. Through the process, the cinnamon and coffee grounds fell onto the wax, and it doesn’t come off easy. The paper towel will keep the wax clean. I am going to have to wipe them off which is going to be a pain in the butt…lesson learned.

DSC_0537

If you do decide to do a second coat, be prepared for even more of a mess. Repeat the process of painting them with glue, rolling in cinnamon, and finishing off with a finally coat of glue/Mod Podge to seal. Again, you have to wait 24 hours between each step. Don’t forget to touch up the top little rim of the jars.

DSC_0541

Here they are after two coats and some embellishing. I think they came out so cute. I am planning on pricing them at about $3.00 per candle at my co-op.

DSC_0540

Here are the some of the ways I decided to decorate them. A thin burlap strip topped with a vintage button:

DSC_0531

Thin pieces of twine with rusty stars and hearts:

DSC_0532

Plain ol’ twine and homespun fabric, wrapped around and knotted:

DSC_0534

And a thin twine bow:

DSC_0536

Have fun if you decide to give them a whirl. They are super easy, but be prepared for a long, messy process! I’d love to try this again with mason jars and maybe some larger jar candles. Have a great week and I hope be back soon! 😀

Stamped Wood Magnets

My latest project turned out to be really easy and fun, and I can’t wait to make more! These stamped wood magnets were made entirely out of items I had on hand, but all of the supplies necessary can be picked up at any craft store.

DSC_0534

First I picked out a bunch of stamps, including my dollar store letter stamps (in container) that I planned on stamping out words such as “live, laugh, love” or “simplify.” Spoiler alert – the “word” magnets didn’t come out good. I couldn’t get the spacing right, so I gave up.

DSC_0543

You’ll need basic black ink pads, or whatever color you choose!

DSC_0544

You’ll also need magnets (Walmart), craft glue or E6000, and wooden discs (Michael’s). These are the same discs I like to use for snowman face magnets at Christmas time. These are also the perfect size to make pins, using metal pin backs that are usually found in the jewelry section of the craft store.

DSC_0546

I wanted to make the wood a little more old and worn, so I used a simple paint wash to darken them down a bit. I mixed a little bit of brown acrylic paint with water, so it was really thin.

DSC_0548

Paint the discs and blot off the excess with a paper towel. They only took about a half hour to dry. You can repeat this step a few times to get your desired result.

DSC_0549

The picture does not do them justice…they look darker in person! They could have gone even darker, but I was impatient and wanted to get stampin! hehe 🙂

DSC_0550

Some stamped designs look better than others. These are some of my favorites!

DSC_0553

DSC_0554

Using your craft glue, apply the magnets. I find hot glue doesn’t work as good on these discs. I don’t want them falling apart, so that’s why I went with the regular craft glue. It takes a lot longer to dry, but it’s way stronger.

DSC_0551

And here they are. You could take this project in so many directions!

DSC_0561

I will be back soon; I have some “grubby” candles in the works. They are in the drying phase and I hope to do the next coat and finishing touches early this week! Woohoo! 😀

Reclaimed Wood Signs

So after many months of cold miserable winter weather and NO motivation whatsoever, I finally got around to doing a little crafty project this weekend. When inspiration strikes, you gotta run with it! The inspiration came from this old, weathered piece of wood that I found in the woods while walking the dogs. It’s chippy blue paint screamed country/primitive signage, so I broke out the foam stamps and went at it!

DSC_0412

First I had Greg cut them into strips. We have a big saw in the basement, but you can easily pick up a little electric hand saw from Lowes or Home Depot for $30 or so, and have it on hand for projects like this.

DSC_0415

I did a couple posts on foam stamps many moons ago, so here’s a little refresher. First, I laid out the letters of the word I wanted to stamp (the word is actually faced down; these stamps have letters on both sides) to get an idea of the spacing. I wanted to make sure the word would fit before I started.

DSC_0417

The most important thing I have learned when using foam stamps is do not ever dip the stamps directly into the paint. If you do, you’ll have way too much paint on the surface of the stamp. The minute you press down, it will overflow out the sides of the stamp and make uneven, messy letters. The best method I have found is to use a small piece of sponge and just dab on the paint onto the surface of the letter. Give it a couple of practice runs if need be. For this project, I used white acrylic paint.

DSC_0416

Go ahead and stamp out your word. Then, once dry, I applied some saw-tooth hangers on the back of each sign. These types of hangers are easy to use because you simply press them into the wood, but I hammered them down in for good measure.

DSC_0421

My last step was to spray them with a clear acrylic coat so the paint would not continue to chip off. The wood was really old and brittle and the paint was a bit loose, so I wanted to seal it in place.

DSC_0422

Here are the finished products, but I need your opinion. Should I add a coat of antiquing gel to tone down those bright white letters down a bit? I wasn’t sure if I should or not. They have kind of a “beachy” feel.

DSC_0428

I added a little star fish because I felt like it went with the cottage theme and filled up the space on the right that was a bit uneven from the space on the left. FYI those star fish are only $1 at AC Moore’s.

DSC_0429

So here they are. They are going over to my booth at the Carriage Place this week. I’ll probably price them around $7-$8 each. With “found” wood, it’s 99% profit, so no need to mark them up with a high price and let them sit in my booth for months!

DSC_0431

Part of my motivation also stemmed from an awesome estate sale that I went to on Saturday. I got tons and tons of great country/primitive themed items, including some nice antiques. This picture only shows a fraction of what I picked up there. It was half off everything so I literally loaded my car! It’s the first really great sale I’ve been to in a while, so this really got me excited! I love “pickin” season!!!

DSC_0424

Earlier in the week, I also got really lucky and picked up this old wooden butter churn……wait for it……off the side of the road!!! It’s amazing what some people throw away. I cleaned it up and now this cool piece will go to the co-op this week with the rest of the stuff from the sale.

DSC_0423

Well, let me know your thoughts on the signs. They are already really “distressed” looking, which is why I’m not sure on adding the antiquing gel. Have a great week and happy crafting!

Simple Winter Snowman Signs

Here are some very simple winter signs that I made using some wood plaques I picked up at the thrift store a while back. They were half off, making them a dollar each! Even if you’re not great at painting free-hand, these snowmen are really easy!

DSC_0001

First I painted the plaques black using a basic craft acrylic paint. They weren’t covered completely with one coat, but that’s okay because the next step is to distress them with sandpaper.

DSC_0003

Just take a small piece of sandpaper and give them a good once-over.

DSC_0008

I speckled some white paint to make the “snow” effect, using some slightly watered-down white paint and a firm paint brush. I just pulled the bristles back and flicked it over top of the plaques. I then free-handed the words and painted big white circles for the snowman heads. You could also use foam stamps or stencils for the words.

DSC_0009

Next, paint big orange noses, little pink circles for the cheeks, and black dots for the eyes and mouths.

DSC_0032

Once dry, I did one coat of sparkle mod podge. It acts as a sealer but also give them a little sparkle. This step is not necessary though if you’re going to be keeping them inside.

DSC_0033

For hanging, I simply used two small nails to tack down a strip of torn homespun.

DSC_0078

Here they are, all finished. You can’t really appreciate the sparkle in this pic, but they look quite festive in person.

DSC_0081

And here’s a pic of them hanging up in my booth along with some of the Christmas crafts I made in the last few posts!

DSC_0097

Hope everyone had a fantastic Thanksgiving!

Winter Jar Scenes

The holiday craft bug has bit me and I just finished up another project; a big batch of winter jar scenes using mason jars and bottle brush trees. I have seen them on Pinterest, so here is my version. 🙂

DSC_0074

I started by gathering some jars. I used some mason jars I had on hand, and found these ones at Target. I also got a few jars of different shapes, at the Goodwill for super cheap.

DSC_0028

The two small jars on the right are salt & pepper shakers I got from Walmart. I love these cause they are like mini snow globes!

DSC_0050

I used various bottle brush trees; all of which I found at A.C. Moore in either the doll house/miniature section, or the seasonal Christmas section. I also found some cute mini gold reindeer, perfect for this project.

DSC_0030

DSC_0034

The ones with the wooden bases were easy to glue in place. I used hot glue and they seem to be holding pretty firm on the glass. Some people who do this project don’t even glue them down. They will simply add their “snow” and then stick the trees down in. I like them glued in place so they don’t keep falling over.

DSC_0035

The ones without wooden bases posed a bit of a challenge. I created a ball of hot glue on the ends to use as a base. Looking back it would have been easier to use some clay or floral foam, but too late now!

DSC_0038

DSC_0040

DSC_0051

I then added the “snow.” I started out using coarse sea salt and when I ran out, I got Epsom salt. They both work great as snow. The Epsom salt had a peppermint smell too, which is perfect for Christmas crafts! 🙂

DSC_0056

I used tweezers to place the small deer in the snow and big tongs for the deeper jars. I must say this part was a challenge. I did not glue the deer in place because they’d be almost completely covered with the snow. I did push them down in pretty good, and because they are light weight, I am hoping they won’t move around too much.

DSC_0045

I picked up this wad of tin garland at the thrift store last year and stashed it away because I knew I could cut them apart and use them to accent winter crafts. I used the snowflakes to tie around the tops of the jars to give them a little extra country Christmas look!

DSC_0054

Here is one of the completed jars with the snowflake tied around the neck of the jar. I love how they came out!

DSC_0060

For the smaller jars, I left out the deer and just did a little tree scene, and accented it with a raffia bow.

DSC_0057

Here are a few more!

DSC_0062

DSC_0064

For these larger jars, I thought I’d make them into candle holders. I put a small glass tea light holder right into the mouth of the jar. You can get these small glass tea light holders at the Dollar Tree.

DSC_0065

DSC_0066

And remember these from last year?? I had some smaller trees left over and decided to use them up on these cute car ornaments! I got the cars last year after Christmas at Walmart. I am selling them for about $5.50-$6 each. Honestly, I will probably break even on the car ornaments, but I don’t care because they were really fun to make and a fun item to sell around the holidays!

DSC_0071

DSC_0072

DSC_0073

I’m selling the winter jar scenes are ranging from $4-$8 at my co-op, so we’ll see how they go. Hope everyone has a Happy Turkey Day! 🙂

Snowman Wine Bottle Toppers

I was out doing some shopping and came across these cute little hat ornaments and “DING”…a light bulb went off and I thought I could use them for snowman hats. Yes, Christmas displays are in full swing at all the big box stores; I got these at Walmart, next to all the tree ornaments. If you can’t find these particular hats, there are other options out there. Look in the ornament section for different types of hats, and check the doll-making section of the craft stores. You can also click here for a link to some hats you could use instead.

DSC_0007

I had these little terra cotta pots in my craft stash of supplies. I think you can get them at any craft store.

DSC_0006

I painted them white using my heavy artists’ while acrylic paint, since I was out of regular white craft paint. Warning: it takes a gazillion coats to cover the terra cotta. You’ll probably have to do 4-5 coats with the regular craft acrylic. Spray painting might have been an easier option.

DSC_0011

Then I painted on some faces. I love making snowman stuff, because the faces are so easy to paint. You can make the noses all different shapes and sizes.

DSC_0013

I then used a hot glue gun to adhere the hats to the top of the snowman pots. At this point, I thought I was done. But they seemed plain, like they were missing something…

DSC_0016

So I decided to add some little homespun fabric scarfs. I just tore little strips and tied them on.

DSC_0018

They fit perfect on top of a wine bottle. They would make fun stocking stuffers or a nice complement to that bottle of wine you’re giving as a Christmas gift.

DSC_0030

DSC_0026

They also make cute little “shelf sitters” and can go anywhere, not just on top of a wine bottle! I think I will try selling them for $3.50-$4.00 a piece at my co-op.

DSC_0024

I had a lot of fun working on this project. It has helped motivate me a bit and I have some other cool little Christmas-themed projects in the works. Hope to share them with you soon!!! 🙂

Easy Country Decor Ideas: Filling Old Jars

Happy Independence Day to all my crafty friends out there! A day off work meant a little time to do some thrifting this morning, and boy did I score some great stuff! It also got the crafty juices flowing and I decided to do a little bit of tinkering with some left over mason jars and jar-filler ideas. I always seem to have an abundance of mason jars from other projects, garage sales, etc. I can never resist buying them if the price is right, because I always seem to find a use for them! 🙂

DSC_0001

Forgive me if you’ve seen similar pictures and content from previous posts – this is just a recap of all the jar filler ideas I’ve done in the past few years! 😀

The first set of jars I filled with glass marbles. They look great as is, but would also look nice with a twine bow or homespun ribbon tie. I like them just plain!

DSC_0009

Where did I get the marbles you ask? You’ll never believe it…

DSC_0003

The dollar store!!! Not the Dollar Tree, but a random dollar store called “Real Deals.” That’s why I say you have to stop at all different kinds of dollar stores whenever you see them, because you just never know what kind of great crafting supplies you’ll find! I love these because they look genuinely vintage, but were a fraction of the price!

DSC_0005

Vintage buttons make for another great jar filler. These two particular jars are for sale in my Etsy shop. Old buttons are so beautiful and interesting to look at, so why not display them as art? 🙂 I also like to use other types of glass jars like this one on the left, which I think is a vintage jam jar. Not sure though, but I love its textured look and weathered tin lid.

DSC_0006

I filled the next set of jars with some “fixins” which I had lying around, waiting to be scented. I decided to put them in the jars unscented and will tie on a small vial of scenting oil to go with them, so people can refresh the scent now and again. I took out the flat metal lid that goes under the screw cap and replaced it with a square of homespun fabric. I think I will do a big batch of these for Fall and tie on a little tag with a crow or pumpkin on it. I buy these rosehips/putka pods in bulk from various suppliers online.

DSC_0008

Here are a few jars I have filled that are already decorating my house. More vintage buttons and clay marbles from a flea market.

DSC_0010

Dang I love those old clay marbles! I think it’s the palette of earth tone colors that gets me. 🙂

DSC_0011

Here’s how I have some jars displayed, just to give you some ideas.

DSC_0016

DSC_0020

Another easy and cheap bowl filler idea are old Christmas tree bulbs! I find them at every freakin garage sale and estate sale I go to, always buried on the big table of Christmas crap that no one wants. Therefore, they are often very cheap! Obviously these would be great sellers at Christmas craft shows. Accents with a little jingle bell or Christmas themed fabric ties would look great too!

DSC_0018

My last idea for today’s post are old keys. I buy lots of skeleton keys where ever I can, and they often include random other types of keys (more like “modern” key shapes and generally more boring/run of the mill keys) which I usually toss to the side. This is the jar I found at the thrift store today and I thought they’d go perfect together. I really like how it looks and think I’ll keep this one. 😛

DSC_0026

Well here they are all together! I am obsessed! I love them all!!!

DSC_0024

Some other ideas that come to mind are:

  • Acorns
  • Cool lookin’ seed pods
  • Potpourri
  • Sea Shells
  • Sea Glass
  • Wax tarts
  • Jacks (the old children’s game)
  • Old pins, brooches, or vintage clip on earrings

What other jar filler ideas can you guys think of? Send me pics of your jar decorations and I’ll post ’em here! Have a great 4th!

 ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Here is a picture of some mason jar center pieces filled with lovely black & white family photos, created by reader Susie! Here is the link to her full post: http://www.susiewittwer.com/2013/01/mason-jars-family-photos.html. I just love the idea of using vintage papers/photos inside the jars!  😛

mason jars pic 13

Single Stem Vases

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to all my fellow Irishmen & women! 🙂 Before I get to today’s craft project, I thought I’d share an update on the primitive crate shutter I made. I finally found a little pip berry wreath at my friend June’s antique store, and it was the perfect size to place right in the center of the shutter! Woohoo!

DSC_0455

I used some thin green floral wire to tie it on the shutter, sliding it between the slats of the crate boards, and securing on the back.

DSC_0456

I then used some jute twine, knotted through the pre-existing holes (from where nails held the crate pieces together) to make a hanger.

DSC_0457

It’s heading over to my co-op this week. I am putting $22 on it. It only cost a few bucks to make – the pip berry wreath being the only expense. The rest of the supplies were on hand, and I was able to re-use an old dilapidated crate that may have otherwise gone in the burn pile! 🙂

DSC_0458

Ok, and not for the single stem bottles project. It’s a “dollar craft” because these awesome little bottles are only $1 at Michael’s craft store! The rest of the supplies I had on hand.

DSC_0441

You can accent the bottles with whatever you’d like! I decided to use rusty tin stars, little enamel number plates, and some skeleton keys. You could also use buttons, twine bows, little pip berry sprigs, faux berries or flowers, sea shells, antique broaches…be creative!

DSC_0443

Took a strip of torn homespun fabric and used a hot glue gun to secure it in place.

DSC_0444

Here are the finished bottles! They could be used for general decor or as single stem flower vases! 🙂

DSC_0446

DSC_0452

I am going to price them at $4 each and see how it goes!

DSC_0454

And last but not least, some great thrift store finds! It’s quite a random collection of items, but cool nonetheless! I found a mint condition 1957 Chevy model car, a chunky primitive candle, a beautiful vintage brass and enamel bowl, and an old brass Eiffel Tower bottle opener!

DSC_0439

I also found a colorful enamel pot, a wooden wall decor/candle holder, and another little brass elf dude that I could not resist. Vintage brass seems to sell really well on Etsy and in te co-op.

DSC_0438

The major score of the trip was a bag of vintage brass horse buckles / tack medallions, in a variety of designs and shapes. I thought they were trivets at first, but upon further research I found that they are used to decorate horse tacks and bridles. They are collectible and are oh so cool!!! Some will go to the co-op and some on Etsy!

DSC_0433

DSC_0436

Hope everyone has a fantastic St. Patrick’s Day! Cheers! 🙂

Fun & Easy DIY Ornament: Vintage Toy Car & Christmas Tree

Another Pinterest inspired craft has taken over my kitchen counter, this time in the form of cute toy cars toting Christmas trees! Some are table top decorations and some are hanging ornaments for the tree; it is up to you which kind to make. They are fun and super-duper easy. Here’s my version!

DSC_0418

First I went to the Christmas section of A.C. Moore to get some bottle-brush trees, but being so close to Christmas, they were sold out! Luckily, I was able to find some in the dollhouse section where there is a variety of miniature items. I found a package with different sized trees and snow-covered branches…perfect!

DSC_0413

I got the vintage themed cars at Walmart. You could use any cars you want, but I just love the vintage look of the VW’s and old Chevy’s!

DSC_0414

To tie them atop the cars, I used red & white baker’s twine and thin hemp that I had on hand. This particular type of hemp is found in the jewelry-making section of the craft store.

DSC_0415

Then, simply tie them on top! Some tutorials said glue the tree in place, but I didn’t find that necessary.

DSC_0420

DSC_0416 2

With the Chevy’s, I was able to slide the hemp through the windows. For the buses, I had to tie them all the way around. Both look pretty cute!

DSC_0419 copy

DSC_0416

DSC_0421

Great for stocking stuffers, craft shows, small gifts, or for decorating the house! I just love these and can’t wait to make more!!! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all my friends, family, and blog buddies! 🙂

Salt Dough Snowman Pops

Hope everyone is having a great holiday season so far! All of the festivities lately have gotten me in the mood for some Christmas crafting so I decided to try my hand at recreating the “snowman pop.” I bought a snowman pop ornament at a craft show years ago, and used it as my guide for this project. Here’s the how-to!

Screen Shot 2017-08-26 at 10.15.21 PM

Start with your standard salt dough recipe. I used 1/2 cup salt, 1/2 cup flour and 1 cup water (which you’ll add slowly – you may not need the full cup). It made a small batch, so double it for larger quantities! Mix the ingredients til your dough is firm but not too sticky.

DSC_0469

Treat them like sugar cookies! Use flour if the dough sticks, and roll them out to the thickness you want. Mine ended up being about 1/3 inch thick. I would suggest making them on the thicker side if you plan on inserting the lollipop stick; otherwise they crack or bulge.

DSC_0471

I did not have any round cookie cutters on hand so I improvised with this wine glass. It was the perfect size!

DSC_0472

These are the lollipop sticks I used. They can be found in the baking/candy making section of any craft store.

DSC_0473

Don’t forget to pre-poke your lollipop holes before baking!

DSC_0474

I also made some chunky little noses. I made them after I was all done with the snowman faces. When I went to stick them on, the faces had already dried a bit, and they would not stick. I decided to glue them on after baking. If you want to stick them on, do it while the dough is still a little sticky.

DSC_0475

Bake at a VERY low setting (100-150 degrees) for 3 hours. Flip them and bake for another hour. Too hot and they will burn, so be careful! Once dried, I used some artist acrylic paints. These will also help seal the ornaments.

DSC_0476

For the faces I did a white wash (watered down white paint), as these acrylics are really thick. It soaked into the porous surface quite nicely. I then glued on the noses with regular craft tacky glue. I’d recommend doing this BEFORE painting the faces white, as they did not stick well with the layer of white paint…oops. Now I know!

DSC_0480

I decided to stick with rosy cheeks and little dotted eyes, and that’s it. These are the more “prim” looking snowmen that I love!

DSC_0482

Next, insert the sticks. Put a dab of craft glue on the end of the stick, and carefully stick them in the pre-made holes. Use a gentle twisting motion to stick them in; be careful not to crack the thin walls of the snowman head.

DSC_0483

For the tags, I used heavy stock kraft paper from A.C. Moore. I used our regular ink jet printed and Microsoft Word to write “Snow Pop, 5 cents.” You could write any holiday wish you’d like, or even put someone’s name on the tag!

DSC_0486

I hand cut them into little tag shapes and punched a small hole.

DSC_0488

For the wrapping, I used pretzel baggies, which are also found in the baking/candy making isle at the craft store. They are actually made to package chocolate covered pretzels, but my snowman pops fit in them perfectly!!! They are tied up with homespun and twine, and each have their own little tag. I also made some candy swirl ones where I just free-handed a red swirl. I like the snowmen better but I guess they’re kinda cute too.

DSC_0489

The other lady had inserted a string through the top plastic wrapping to hang them up. I decided to leave them as is and just prop them up in a jar of buttons or marbles. They’d made great favors for a Christmas dinner with all of the guests names on the tags!

DSC_0493

So what do you think? There are many directions to take these. Try different faces, use other types of tags or ties, or try gingerbread men or Santa faces!

DSC_0496

I will probably sell them in my Etsy store, for around $3-4 each. If you give these a try, please send me a pic and I will post it here! Thanks and hope to be back soon!!! 🙂

DSC_0497

Marble Magnet Wedding Favors

I know I have done marble magnet posts before but I really haven’t had much else going on in the crafting department, so I thought I’d do a step-by-step post again as a “refresher course” if you will. I also came up with a new and different way of packaging them, which I thought may be an option for those wanting to make these for craft shows! 🙂

First you have to decide what your content will be. I created 1″ customized images for a friend’s wedding, using Photoshop. You can really use anything to create your magnets – magazines, scrapbook paper, or create your own themed images.

DSC_0284

Here are the main supplies I used. Magnets (Walmart), clear silicone (Lowe’s), clear plastic cabachons (allstarco.com) and a plastic tool thingy that I found in my utensil drawer. You can use anything to apply the silicone – a toothpick works just as well.

You can use different supplies, like clear glass marbles (from the Dollar Tree) instead of the plastic cabs, but I highly recommend that you use the silicone shown here. Others use Mod Podge, craft glue, etc., but I have had absolutely awesome results using this clear silicone. It is also very strong and will make your magnets last for years.

DSC_0286

I also used a 1″ hole punch to make my images the exact correct size. You can cut them out if you’d like, but this is definitely a great tool if you’re planning on mass producing these things.

DSC_0289

Put a pea-sized dab of silicone on your image…

DSC_0290

And smush down the cab or marble, applying even pressure. Any excess silicone that spills out the sides can easily be wiped off with your finger or a paper towel. The image is instantly magnified.

DSC_0291

I use the same silicone to apply the magnet. A little less than a pea-sized dab will do. It is very strong!

DSC_0292

Next, for the packaging, I used a large tag-shaped punch and some heavy stock craft paper (both from A.C.Moore). The tag punches are very expensive, so I will always wait for a 50% off coupon before purchasing something like that. It is well worth the money though, because it’s a great tool.

DSC_0293

Again, you could use a heavy scrapbook paper or whatever material you’d like. I printed out a poem on mine, which will be the back of the tag. Use the open side of the punch to line up your text/image before punching.

DSC_0295

In the mean time, let your marble magnets dry thoroughly before packaging. I let mine sit overnight.

DSC_0296

To get the magnets to lay flat on the tag, and not cling together, I used removable Glue Dots. Simply stick them to the backs of the magnets and stick them to the tag. This way you won’t have a nice package with a little ball of magnets that are all stuck together.

DSC_0301

DSC_0304

You could leave them as is, or bag them up. I used candy-making treat bags because they come in a variety of sizes and are very inexpensive.

DSC_0306

Unfortunately I could not find the exact size I needed, so I had to improvise. I folded the excess bag over to the back and applied a small piece of clear scotch tape.

DSC_0310

Then finish off with ribbon, jute, homespun fabric, or whatever you’d like. For these I did purple ribbon and a jute twine bow.

DSC_0311

DSC_0312

I got a chance to swing by the thrift store yesterday and boy am I glad I did! The key is to go often, because merchandise changes a lot in those places! I got some goodies that are already priced and ready to go in my booth. Cast iron candle holders, a counter top glass container, and some cute little country decorations. I also got some great brand-new rubber stamps, which will go in my Etsy store.

DSC_0316

We all know how expensive stamps are, so this was a major score!

DSC_0298

I also picked up some apple pie casserole dishes. They are not exactly my cup of tea, but these types of things sell very well around Fall time. People are thinking about Thanksgiving, comfort foods, etc., and always seem to be looking for casserole dishes.

DSC_0317

Have a great day and hope to be back soon! Happy crafting! 🙂

Vintage Spoon Bookmarks

My latest project involves upcycling some old flatware into fun and unique bookmarks! I bought a handmade spoon bookmark at a craft show a few years back with the intent to copy the idea. I recently got a bunch of great vintage spoons at a flea market, so I decided to try it out. They came out pretty awesome! 🙂

DSC_0223

To do this project you need some spoons, a hammer, an old towel, and something flat to hammer on. I used a big piece of flat plywood. I think the older spoons work better because they are thinner and more flexible than newer spoons. I don’t think dollar store spoons would work well for these, but I could be wrong! I also prefer the vintage spoons because they are unique and come in lots of interesting designs.

DSC_0196

Before hammering, I put the towel over the spoon, to minimize scratching and denting. It worked well, except the towel is pretty much destroyed but the time you’re done.

DSC_0202

Start hammering away! I turned the spoon over a few times while hammering, to ensure it was flat on both sides. It will never be completely flat; there will always be slight bumps and grooves. It just adds to the vintage charm if you ask me!

I used my original spoon bookmark as a guide of where to bend the handle.

DSC_0199

Some spoons bent easily, and some did not. Some of them required a little tap of the hammer, near the bend of the spoon, to fully bend it over (using the towel again, so as not to dent or scratch). It takes some experimenting, so don’t spend a fortune on your spoons. I got mine for super cheap at a flea market, so breaking a few here and there was not a big deal.

DSC_0210

I had some casualties. A few of the spoons snapped as soon as I started to bend them.

DSC_0213

The broken spoon parts worked great as metal retrieving pieces for Greg to use in his K-9 searching/training. He chucked this spoon piece out into the yard, and Djaiko (pronounced “Jake-o”) was able to find it in less than a minute! See it there in his mouth? 🙂

DSC_0217

After flattening and bending all the spoons, I cleaned them up using some silver polish. I LOVE these Howard products that a fellow vendor sells at my co-op. They work awesome and are very reasonably priced.

DSC_0214

DSC_0215

And here are some pictures I took for the ones I am now selling in my Etsy store. This is one of the “miniature” spoons…

DSC_0218

And some other cool ones with fun handle designs.

DSC_0226

DSC_0233

I think these would be great craft show sellers, or great gifts for pretty much anyone. I just got a bunch more spoons and plan to make more in the near future. Hope you’re able to give it a try! Thanks for stopping in and Happy Crafting! 🙂

Previous Older Entries Next Newer Entries