Salt Shaker Snowmen

I have been wanting to make these snowmen for a long time and finally found some motivation to get crafting and give it a whirl! I call this a hodge-podge project because you can use whatever supplies you have on hand to make and decorate them. I had a stash of old buttons, jewelry, and ribbon, that I broke out to complete this project. Here’s my take on the Salt Shaker Snowman!

First off, please ignore the messy background of my pics! I hope I’m not the only one whose craft area looks like it was hit by a hurricane! Lol. So the basic supplies you’ll need are salt shakers and heads. I got the tall shakers from the Dollar Tree and the short ones from the thrift store. The large wooden beads came from Michael’s, which I had on hand. You could also use white, round Christmas ornaments for the heads. This could definitely be a full “dollar store craft” because you can find shakers, white ornaments, and all kinds of seasonal accessories there!

Fill them up with whatever you’d like. I chose white vintage buttons for one and some silver tinsel for the other.

Hot glue your heads in place.

I had this white fur lying around for the sock gnomes I plan on making some day! Haha…so many projects, so little time! Anyway I thought it would look cute around their necks and hide the hot glue. I would recommend painting the heads white before you attach the fur or other neck decorations. I forgot this step and had to paint around the fur afterwards, which was kind of a pain. I used white acrylic craft paint.

Start adding your accessories. I keep a drawer of vintage jewelry pieces, beads, buttons, and just a bunch of random little items that I will draw from for projects just like this! I strung up some little tiny pearls on a thin piece of wire to accent the neck. I twisted it off and just tucked the excess under the beads.

Glue the tops of the shakers on to create their “hats.”

Originally I had planned on making noses out of Sculpey. I decided that was too much work and improvised. I clipped off the ends of two orange colored paint brushes and glued them on. You could also just paint on a nose if you’d prefer.

I used the pointed end of some paint brushes to dab on black eyes and pink cheeks. It’s a great way to make perfect little circles.

As an afterthought I decided to add my favorite sealing coat: sparkley Mod Podge! Probably would have been best to do this after I painted them white, before adding all of the accessories and face.

The tall guy is has a vintage button theme. The white rose on his hat is actually an old button. I added the off-white ribbon scarf to match the off-white buttons inside. The smaller one is more “blingy,” with his bright silver tinsel picking up the bright silver hat and sparkly accents.

There’s so much room to customize these snowmen for your theme or decor. Pinterest has a ton of different salt shaker snow-people so give it a look to get some ideas! You can make them super simple, or jazz them up with lots of bling. Hope everyone has been having a nice Fall, enjoying some crafting, and staying safe!

 

 

 

Wood Slice Snowmen Ornaments

This post is at the request of a few readers who saw these cute little guys hanging from my tomato cage ornament displays in the last post. I thought I’d share how I made them, since they are soooo easy and soooo cute!

I got these wood slices at…you guessed it…the Dollar Tree! However, I only found them once. I have tried to get more but I can’t seem to find them at my local dollar stores anymore. If you can’t find them at DT, you can get similar ones at any craft store, or you can order them in bulk online. I am very lucky because I ended up having my husband cut a ton more slices for me from some old birch stems that were on our property! πŸ™‚

Start by painting them white, using whatever acrylic paint you have on hand. I did two coats.

I did a little icy blue highlight on the sides to give them some dimension. This step is optional but I like the subtle color it adds.

Then, paint your noses.

And last, two tiny black dots for the eyes.

To hang them, use some small screw eyes. You can find these at any home improvement store. With a little muscle, you can just screw them in with your hands. Sometimes you need to finish screwing them in with a little pair of pliers, as they can get tough to turn.

Then hang them with a piece of twine, ribbon, or a wire ornament hanger. I used red and white bakers twine. I also did a top coat of my favorite sparkly Mod Podge to seal them and give them a little shimmer!

I made a few using two wood slices to make a “whole” snowman, instead of just the face. It’s the exact same process except you’ll use a total of 3 eye screws for these. One screw on the top to hang, and two more to connect them (you will need pliers to open one up, to slip the other on to). Finish with whatever accents you’d like; I added a homespun fabric scarf and a rusty tin star.

I love the they came out. I mass produced them for my craft show in October. Hopefully it does not get cancelled, but you never know these days. Hope you all are staying healthy and safe. Thanks for following along! Happy crafting!!! πŸ™‚

Snowball Bucket Ornaments

I know it’s June…but I was accepted into a big craft show at the end of October so I am working away at some new Christmas and winter themed ornaments! I saw a version of these on Pinterest and put my own spin on them. Introducing the snowball bucket ornament!

The little white metal buckets can be found at the Dollar Tree, in the party section. I believe they were either for wedding or baby shower favors, and come two to a package. I picked up a variety of white pom-pom’s at Michaels. For variety, some are plain and some sparkly. πŸ™‚

It seems like a waste to fill up the entire bucket with the white pom-poms, since you wouldn’t see all of the ones in the bottom. So I decided to use some cardboard to fill the bottom of the bucket.

I cut a strip of cardboard and folded it into a triangle and hot glued it to the bottom of the bucket. This acts as a little platform. Then cut out a small circle of cardboard and glue on top of your platform. This gives you something to glue the pom-poms onto.

I painted the cardboard circle white, so that if it showed through at all, it would be less noticeable.

Next, use a hot glue gun to cover the cardboard with your pom-poms. I did one layer of the small ones first.

Then I started piling on some of the bigger, sparkly ones, mixed in with some more smaller ones. Keep adding them until you are satisfied with your pile of “snowballs.”

Similar ornaments on Pinterest had the words “snowballs 5 cents” handwritten on the side of the bucket. I tried it and didn’t like how mine came out. You could do this with a paint pen or Sharpie, but know that once you write it, it is permanent! Not a lot of room for error, but if you have a steady hand, then go for it!

Instead, I opted to make little tags using some brown craft paper. I wrote the words and then cut out a tag shape around it. This way, if you mess up, you can just add a new tag and not waste a bucket. You could even get fancy and print out little tags if you don’t want to hand-write them.

I used a small safety pin to attach the tags to the bucket handle. For a little accent, I added a homespun fabric ribbon. On others I added a light blue bakers twine bow. You could finish them off with twine, ribbon, or whatever decorative accents you would like!

FYI, the Dollar Tree sells Baker’s twine in every color, in their craft section. I have hordes of it because I use it for all different projects.

I am debating if I should put little hangers on them like the one pictured above, or leave as is, and people could hang them from their tree from the bucket handle. Which do you prefer? Thanks in advance for your thoughts! Hope everyone is staying safe and enjoying some crafty adventures!

Dollar Store Gnome Ornaments

Hello! Hope everyone is staying safe and healthy during these crazy times. I am back with a project I actually did a while ago but just realized I never posted! I created these little gnome ornaments using some unfinished dollar store Easter egg ornaments. They came out super cute and were pretty easy.

Here are the egg ornaments I used. I found them at the Dollar Tree. I grabbed a ton because there are so many possibilities with them. At 5 for $1, you can’t go wrong!

I used tape to create the straight lines of the gnome body and some of their beards. Please note that you can totally skip the tape steps and paint them free-hand if you’d like! If you are going to use the tape method, here’s how.

Using some tape, make a triangle shape. Make the triangle as tall as you’d like your gnome to be. I would have preferred to use masking tape but I was out. Hope you can see the clear tape lines okay.

If you’d like a straight, pointed beard, then add two more pieces of tape on the bottom to create a diamond shape.

Using acrylic paint, fill in the bottom half of the diamond with white for the gnomes beard. I created a small peak, or rounded top to the beard, just to give the beard some shape. It may need two coats. Let each coat dry completely before applying the next coat.

Then fill in your hat. Once the beard is dry, peel away the bottom pieces of tape and fill in the red body around the beard. Once the entire gnome body is dry, peel all of the tape away. Fill in the outside with whatever background color you’d like.

The gnome on the right has a “textured” beard. This was just an experiment. I used some salt mixed into some white paint and a bit of white glue. Then just dabbed it on. It came out pretty good, kind of like the textured snow paint you get at the craft store. If you decide to try it, be sure to seal it when you’re done. I can not confirm how long this lasts or how good the quality is, as it was my first time playing around with this kind of textured paint.

Next, add your nose. You can paint one on, or use a small wooden disc like these. I happened to have these on hand and the small ones worked perfectly. You could also use a button for a 3D effect, and paint it flesh colored.

Then add any details. Again, I had this stuff on hand. My craft stash is ridiculous and has accumulated over the years, so I can often find random little “accents” like this. You can always paint these types of details on, or check out the dollar store or craft store for little accents you can add!

The same little wooden discs that were used for the nose can be used for the hands!

I even found these cute coffee cups at Michaels and thought the gnomes might look cute sipping some hot cocoa or coffee while they are out there in the snow. πŸ™‚

When you’re all done, add a coat of sealer. I used sparkle Mod Podge to give them some holiday bling.

Use twine, string or ribbon to hang them. I used bakers twine. This can be found at Dollar Tree in a variety of colors.

Here are the finished products. You can’t appreciate the “sparkle” in the photos, but in real life, they are very shimmery!

Here are the next ones in progress…can you guess what they will be???

 

DIY Fall Carnival Game ~ Dollar Store Ring Toss

Once again I’m working on a craft project for my local scarecrow festival! Most of the supplies for this game were got at the Dollar Tree. The rest of the supplies I had on hand, however you really could get everything you need at the dollar store if you needed to!

I started out with a bunch of foam cones that are found in the faux flower/craft section of the Dollar Tree. My husband seems to thing these are going to break once the kids start playing, but I’m thinking it’s going to be fine after testing it and whipping the rings at them…lol. They are pretty secure and it’s a harder foam; not a soft foam that easily dents. You could also use the plastic orange cones found in the athletic section of Wally world.

I used acrylic paint I got from Lowes. These are sample jars that I like to get for crafts since they come in a huge variety of colors. Any acrylic would work fine.

Paint the centers orange and the bases yellow so they look like candy corns.

While those were drying I spray painted a big piece of scrap wood black. You also could use a heavy foam core board, or a big piece of cardboard. Wood is ideal because it is heavier but other materials could be used as long as you have a way of anchoring it down.Β 

I used some heavy duty glue to adhere the foam candy corns and a few small scarecrows, also got at the Dollar Tree, to the board. Use a very strong glue to ensure they stay attached to the board.

Next use stamps, stencils or free hand the “point” numbers below each cone or scarecrow.

Next I used stamps to write out “Ring Toss” along the bottom of the board. You can write whatever you want or write nothing…it’s up to you!

The rings are made from kids glowstick necklaces that come 4 in a package at the dollar store. I taped them to make sure they don’t come apart. They are lightweight and are the perfect sized rings for this game!

The game is pretty self-explanatory but I decided to make a small instruction sign using a chalkboard sign I already had, since the game is going to be at a festival. I made a line in the grass using orange duct tape.

That’s it! Easy and hopefully a fun little activity for kids to play while walking around the festival this year. Next on the agenda is a pumpkin tic tac toe game! Be back soon!

 

“Buddy the Elf” and Snowman Candles

Calling all Cotton Headed Ninny Muggins!!! Christmas crafting has officially begun! These “Buddy the Elf” and snowman candles were made using the tall prayer candles that are available at most dollar stores. White ones are the easiest to find, and are a great template for a simple snowman. The green candles were perfect for an elf, which I created based on the character Buddy from the Christmas movie “Elf”! I will admit, the Elf candle was a little more time-consuming than I had hoped, but if you’re a fan of the movie like I am, it’s totally worth it! πŸ™‚

Let’s start with the elf candle. Start out by drawing the outline of the jacket using a black paint pen. The nice thing about painting on glass is, if you mess up, you can wipe it off using a cotton ball and some rubbing alcohol and start again. Fill in the bottom section with yellow paint. I used Americana multi-surface satin acrylic paint. Unfortunately it took about 5-6 coats to get it opaque. The first few coats showed significant streaking, but it got better with each coat…be patient! Maybe a chalk paint would have been better? Anywho, next use a stencil brush to “dab” on the white collar.

Here are the exact paints and the types of brushes I used. They are supposed to be good on glass, but again, it took a TON of coats to get good coverage. I do like the end result though!

Once dry, draw on the little squiggles on his jacket using a yellow paint pen. I also drew a belt and buckle using black and yellow paint pens. I free-handed it, but you can use small strips of tape to create straight lines if you want.

If you know the movie, the likeness to Buddy the Elf is pretty good. πŸ™‚ I’m happy with him!

Next is the snowman candle, which was significantly less cumbersome! Start with your basic country snowman nose.

Use the black paint pen to draw on eyes and a mouth.

Use your stencil brush or a piece of sponge to dab on some rosy cheeks. Tie on a strip of fabric to create a scarf. Quick and easy!

I’ve got a few ideas for some other designs using other colors. I hope to work on them soon and I’ll be sure to post ’em if they turn out any good! πŸ˜‰ Hope everyone had a nice Turkey Day!

Dollar Store Craft: DIY Fall Letter Decor

What is it about Fall that brings out the crafter in me? Part of my recent craftiness has been because I am a committee member on a local small-town festival, and I have been working on some projects for that event. I wanted to share this easy project using really cheap supplies and a super cute result! DIY decorative letters, which could be adapted for all kinds of events or themes!

To start, get your letters! You can find them at any craft store, and even at your Dollar Tree if you’re lucky. I call this a “Dollar Store Craft” because all the supplies were less than $1. I got these letters at Walmart for $.96 each!

Paint them up whatever color you wish! I went with the Fall theme, since it is a Fall festival. πŸ™‚

A fun and easy trick is to use the end of your paint brush to create dots. They come out perfect every time.

Next I hot-glued them onto some mason jars that I had lying around. You could glue them to a basket, a block of wood, or whatever you want to use to stand them up.

These scarecrow heads and raffia were purchased at the Dollar Tree. They also have faux flowers and other trinkets you can use to fill your jars. You could do candy, real flowers, electric tea lights, water and a floating candle…whatever you want to fit your theme.

I tied some raffia around the jars and letters for that Fall feel, and stuck the scarecrow heads and some fake flowers in the jars to create the final look.

You could do these for a child’s room, a baby shower, wedding tables, words for different holidays, your family’s initials; the possibilities are truly endless. These were made for initials of the festival to be displayed in the glass cases at the town hall.

Hope the impending Fall season has got you in the crafty mood too! Be back soon! πŸ™‚

 

Dollar Store Craft ~ Snowman Head Bottle

After my last project, I was in the mood to continue the snowman theme! The result: a cheap glass bottle turned country snowman decor!

I got this $1 bottle at Michael’s because of its unique, narrow shape. As soon as I saw it, I knew it would be the perfect shape for stacked snowman heads! I labeled this post a “dollar store craft” because the Dollar Tree has a great selection of glass jars, wine glasses, glass candle holders, etc., that you could cover with cute snowman faces!

This DecoArt multi-surface paint is my new favorite. It gives great coverage and I love the fact that it cures, leaving a permanent design. Regular acrylic paint will work too, as long as you finish it with a clear sealer.

I used two different sized foam stamp brushes to create the heads. The foam stamps are quick, easy, and make the heads look like fluffy snowballs!

Looking back, I wish I had stamped the heads closer together, creating a more “stacked” look. I shall have to try it next time. For the next step, paint on long, skinny noses and little rosy cheeks. I made sure to point the noses in different directions to keep it interesting!

Then, paint two little dots for the eyes, and more dots in a semi-circle for the mouth.

I added a homespun fabric accent around the neck of the bottle. I debated on using a navy blue or red ribbon, but I always seem to come back to the homespun! I am thinking this is simply a decoration and not a functioning container, as the neck is too skinny for anything to fit down in the jar. Maybe you could use it as a holder for a sprig of poinsettia or holly berries? πŸ˜€

With this paint, it takes a week to cure and will then be a permanent finish. No need to seal, however, I was thinking of putting on a little sparkly mod podge over the faces. Just to give the jar a little sparkle here and there. To sparkle or not to sparkle; that is the question!Β What do you think???

Happy crafting!

P.S. Thank you for all the sweet comments lately. You guys are the best. Hope you’re enjoying the holiday season! ❀

Dollar Store Craft: Pumpkin Wall Light

Who else is in the mood for some Halloween crafting?! The Fall and Halloween decor is popping up everywhere and I’m so super excited!!! After I got ahold of myself and stopped buying Halloween decorations, I decided to stop at the Dollar Tree to look for some new materials to work with. I saw this simple wall light and thought that blank round dome could be easily be converted into a snowman or a pumpkin face! Actually, a snowman face would be super easy since it’s already white to begin with. I shall file that idea away and make some snowmen in a few months. My first attempt was the pumpkin face!

If you don’t know which wall light I am talking about, it’s this one. The batteries are not included so make sure to have 4 AA’s handy.

First, draw your face outline on the light with a pencil.

I decided to use chalky acrylic paint because I thought it would give the best coverage. I am sure regular acrylics would work just fine.

Fill in your face…

And then paint the outer rim. Once they are both dry, fill in the eyes nose and mouth with a black paint pen, or black acrylic paint.

I decided to jazz him up a bit with some light green dashes around the outside rim.

Then I mixed the orange with a touch of white to make a lighter orange, and made some stripes down his face.Β Here he is!

After completely dried, I sprayed him down with a coat of clear poly as a sealer. Then I hung him up and hit the lights! Lit up you can see some of the paint strokes, but he’s still pretty cute. This would make a great night light or cute decoration outside at night!

Also, I wanted to say thank you all for your kind comments on my last post after being away for a while. It’s so nice to hear that you enjoy the posts and maybe find a little inspiration here. It’s been really fun working on some new projects and I hope to hang on to this motivation and run with it!

Have a great weekend everyone! πŸ™‚

Chalk Painted Mason Jars

My latest crating venture has been painting mason jars. I’ve seen them all over Etsy and Pinterest and they are SO darn cute. I especially love the “ombre” jar sets. There are so many possibilities with different colors, sizes, stencils, themes, etc. After much trial and error, I’ve figured out that the type of paint you use is key! Here’s how I tackled this project.

DSC_0354

First, I gathered up some jars. I did a very small batch because I wanted to get the process down before I go nuts painting every jar in sight. LOL. πŸ˜€ I had a few quilted jars and also picked up these sets of mini jars at the Dollar Tree. I love the tiny size of them and think they’ll make cute “trinket jars.”

DSC_0330

For the newer packaged jars, I just started painting. For the previously used jars, I wiped them down with rubbing alcohol to ensure any dirt or oils were removed. A clean jar allows the paint to adhere to the glass better.

DSC_0335

The most important tip for this project: do NOT use regular acrylic paint. Even though many tutorials say it will work, I had a really hard time with getting the regular acrylic to stick to the glass. The first coat would go on streaky and the second coat would peel off the first coat, even after ample drying times. The best paint to use is chalk paint. I got the Craft Smart brand that is a chalky type of acrylic, which seemed to work well. I think the straight up chalk paint will work even better!

DSC_0341

I did the first coat with a soft paint brush and let it dry for 24 hours.

DSC_0338

Some might stop at one coat and be fine with that look, but for me it was a bit too transparent. I found the second coat has to go on quickly. The more brush strokes, the more likely you are to peel off some of the first coat. Overall they came out pretty good.

DSC_0347

I let them dry for another 24 hours. I then used some coarse sand paper to rough them up a little and create a worn, distressed look.

DSC_0349

Once sanded and wiped off with a towel (to get off the paint dust) I sprayed them with a clear sealer. Any clear poly will do. I used a satin spray and really liked the results.

DSC_0350

DSC_0351

Tied on a little twine bow and boom! Do you like them with or without the lids?

DSC_0353

DSC_0354

I love the quilted jars. The raised diamond pattern is pretty cute. I can envision one of these on my counter filled with a little bouquet of flowers. πŸ™‚

DSC_0355

I experimented with using scraps of homespun fabric to accent the jars. I think I like the twine better.

DSC_0356

I think I shall make another big batch with more colors now that I have the process down. For now I’ll put these in my booth at the co-op and see if they move. I’m thinking I’ll price ’em at $2.50 for the small jars and $6.50-ish for the large jars. If you have any tips or tricks for this project, please leave a comment and share!!!

DSC_0357

While the mason jars were drying, I tinkered with another quick project. I found this wooden puzzle while I was perusing the thrift store, and you probably already know what I did with it!

DSC_0339

MAGNETS! I am obsessed with making magnets because they are easy and great sellers.

DSC_0340

I am always on the look out for cool wood puzzle pieces for just this reason. I love this theme!

DSC_0348

Happy crafting! πŸ˜€

Christmas Crafting Has Begun! More Homespun Candy Canes

Well, I don’t have a new project to share…this is one you’ve seen before. My latest crafting venture was a new batch of “homespun candy canes,” in preparation for this years Christmas season at the co-op. I first posted about these years ago, and here is the “how-to” in case you’re interested: Homespun Candy Canes How-To.

DSC_0100

I made a whole bunch of the standard-sized candy canes, but also made a batch of the miniature candy canes. The mini candy canes are a bit more tedious, but seem to be everyone’s fave!

DSC_0101

These are the mini candy canes I used. I got them at The Dollar Tree. They come as garland, so you get 10 of them for a dollar…score!

DSC_0102

Bunched them up into groups of 5, tied together with twine. I plan on pricing them at $4 for a bunch of large ones, and $3 for a bunch of small ones.

DSC_0105

I also worked on a few of these large bells that I had laying around from years ago. They were $1 each at Michael’s.

DSC_0104

I spray painted them with this metallic brown:

DSC_0107

DSC_0103

And made them into hanging ornaments with twine hangers and little fabric accents. They also make nice bowl fillers!

DSC_0106
For displaying the candy canes and other Christmas crafts, I like to put them in old wooden boxes or bowls…

DSC_0115

Or vintage displays like this old red sleigh (both thrift store finds).

DSC_0109

In other news, I am thinking of starting up my Etsy store again. I have all kinds of awesome little antique tins that are beauty/hygiene/medicine themed, with great old graphics on them. I also have tons of skeleton keys and other little items that I would like to sell. It’s a quite a project…photographing a listing everything. Maybe a good winter project for me, we’ll see!

DSC_0111

Aren’t they cool? I just love old tins. The colors and graphics are so fun.

DSC_0112

Have a great weekend and Happy Crafting! πŸ˜€

A New Batch of Silicone Dipped Bulbs & Country Night Lights

It’s been a few years since I’ve made these country night lights with silicone dipped bulbs. In case you haven’t seen my old post on how to make them, here is a refresher! They are cheap to make and great items to sell at craft shows, or for your booth at a craft shop or co-op. For some reason they make me think of Fall, and I love to make them this time of year!

DSC_0130

First, get your night lights at the dollar store. I got these at The Dollar Tree. The bases come in all different colors. I tend to do mostly black and white, but this time I threw in a few blue and aqua ones.

DSC_0100

DSC_0105

Don’t mind my ugly carpet background…was crafting in the basement last night. Along with the night lights, I picked up these packages of extra bulbs. I like to make extra bulbs and sell them as replacements.

DSC_0114

For the bulbs to cure, you need to hang them immediately after dipping. I ran a piece of twine between two shelves and used clothespins to hold them in place.

DSC_0107

Your supplies for the bulbs consist of silicone, a little cup for dipping, cinnamon (optional) and a disposable stick to mix with. I add the cinnamon for a warm, primitive look. You can leave the silicone plain too. I use the basic Walmart brand of silicone. Some brands will work better than others – it’s all trial and error. I’ve had the best luck with this stuff. It seems to be just the right consistency.

DSC_0113

You also need one of these gun thingys, to squirt out the silicone. We happened to have one but they are available next to the silicone in Walmart.

DSC_0115

I ended up tossing my flimsy plastic cup and used a glass cup. It was easier to hold on to while dipping. I find that it works best to fill the cup up completely with the silicone mixture. Take the bulbs and dip them down in and turn them slightly to get the silicone to cover the base of the bulb. Then pull out quickly to create the long “tip”. This can be really challenging and takes some practice.

DSC_0119

You must work quickly because the silicone starts to cure and becomes more difficult to work with. Within 15-20 minutes, the silicone in your cup will probably be stiffer and less pliable. Hang them upside down with your clothespins and let them cure for at least 24 hours.

DSC_0120

When I was done with the bulbs, I worked on the bases. I tied on little strips of homespun fabric, finished with little rusty stars and hearts. For the hearts and stars, I just hot-glued them on. Don’t worry; the night lights to not get warm enough to melt the hot glue.

DSC_0121

Here they are all assembled!

DSC_0123

DSC_0124

I love the warm look you get from the cinnamon. Unfortunately they do not smell like cinnamon though.

DSC_0125

DSC_0132

For a display, I used an old cardboard box and covered the inside with scrapbooking paper. Punch holes through the cardboard with scissors for the little metal part to stick through.

DSC_0134

Don’t get discouraged if you try it and can’t get the bulbs to look right. The brand of the silicone makes a huge difference, and also practice makes perfect. I’ll sell these for probably $4.50 each at the co-op. Hope you have a great Labor Day! πŸ™‚

Primitive Grubby Jar Candles

After seeing these types of “grubby” jar candles on Pinterest for many years, I finally got around to trying them myself. Though it was a very long process, they came out so cute and perfectly primitive! There are many tutorials out there on grubby jars, but they are all pretty much the same: coffee grounds and white glue. You can do mason jars or any type of jar candle…it’s the perfect accent for any country or rustic home.

DSC_0534 2

I started with this set of 12 small jar candles from Walmart. They cost around $6, so profitability on these should be pretty good.

DSC_0534

I made up a mixture of about 2/3 coffee grounds to 1/3 cinnamon. Both can be bought at the dollar store for this project. I used matte Mod Podge, but now that it’s all said and done, I would probably use regular white glue because it’s a lot cheaper. I ended up using almost this whole jar on 12 little candles.

DSC_0536 2

Paint on the glass jars with glue and roll in your coffee/cinnamon mixture.

DSC_0538

DSC_0539

Set them aside to dry. It takes a good 24 hours for them to dry thoroughly.

DSC_0541 2

Once dry, gently tap them on the counter to get off any loose coffee/cinnamon grounds. Then apply another coat of glue to seal it. Be prepared…this part is messy! Don’t worry if more grounds come off because you can always do a second coat.

DSC_0530

Set aside to dry again. Another 24 hours. Ugh…I hate waiting!

DSC_0533

Here they are after they are dried. With just one coat, most of the surface was covered, but there were still a few spots where the glass showed through. I decided to do a second coating of the coffee/cinnamon. Looking back, I think I would just stick with one coat. They’re eventually going to be embellished with homespun fabric or burlap, which will cover up any thin areas. It’s up to you how many coats you do, based on the look you’re going for.

DSC_0535

Another little tip: before you start, put a small piece of paper towel over the wax of your candle. Through the process, the cinnamon and coffee grounds fell onto the wax, and it doesn’t come off easy. The paper towel will keep the wax clean. I am going to have to wipe them off which is going to be a pain in the butt…lesson learned.

DSC_0537

If you do decide to do a second coat, be prepared for even more of a mess. Repeat the process of painting them with glue, rolling in cinnamon, and finishing off with a finally coat of glue/Mod Podge to seal. Again, you have to wait 24 hours between each step. Don’t forget to touch up the top little rim of the jars.

DSC_0541

Here they are after two coats and some embellishing. I think they came out so cute. I am planning on pricing them at about $3.00 per candle at my co-op.

DSC_0540

Here are the some of the ways I decided to decorate them. A thin burlap strip topped with a vintage button:

DSC_0531

Thin pieces of twine with rusty stars and hearts:

DSC_0532

Plain ol’ twine and homespun fabric, wrapped around and knotted:

DSC_0534

And a thin twine bow:

DSC_0536

Have fun if you decide to give them a whirl. They are super easy, but be prepared for a long, messy process! I’d love to try this again with mason jars and maybe some larger jar candles. Have a great week and I hope be back soon! πŸ˜€

Mini Jar Candle Wedding Favors

After a loooong miserable winter, I think it’s safe to say that Spring has finally sprung! Just as I knew it would, the nicer weather has motivated me to get back into the crafting groove and also do some “pickin” at the local thrift stores. Lately, my big project has been mass producing these country jar candles as wedding favors ~ 120 to be exact! You may remember them from one of my very first posts, and they are still just as fun, easy, and inexpensive to make. They are somewhat time-consuming (when doing a large quantity like this) but each jar only costs $1 at Wally World, making for a very economical set of favors!

DSC_0420

I like to use these particular jar candles because they come with an “Easy Peel” label, which allows you to very easily take off the label for crafting. They also smell really great and come in a variety of colors.

DSC_0421

For mass production, I found its easiest to tear all your homespun strips ahead of time. Mine were about 1″ wide and I just tore them, to get that raggedy primitive look. For those who don’t have fabric on hand, I usually get mine by the yard at Joann Fabrics.

DSC_0423

I then use a glue gun to apply the homespun strips. Just a little dab will do ya!

DSC_0425

DSC_0427

I don’t worry about having perfectly clean seams where the fabric comes together, because I plan on wrapping them with twine which camouflages the spots that were glued.

DSC_0428

I then pre-cut a bunch of pieces of twine and wrapped them around the candles a few times and tied them in little knots on the back. I glued on rusty stars and hearts on the front of each candle using E6000 glue. I do not like to use hot glue for the rusty pieces because I find they very easily pop off – hot glue doesn’t stick well to the rusty tin. It also melts as the candle heats up!

icm_fullxfull.35522141_10nwbx0dglo0owk4ssgg

This person also wanted the candles wrapped and tagged for her special day. I laid out the text in Microsoft Word, and used my regular ink jet printer to print them out on sheets of brown kraft paper (from A.C.Moore’s). I used a tag shaped punch, but you could also just cut them out into squares or tags and hole punch them!

icm_fullxfull.35514438_efrj8swlg80k4kc4g0ko

Here is the finished product! The baggies are actually candy/baking treat bags.Β  They are a perfect thin cellophane. I these favors will be just perfect with her country themed wedding!

icm_fullxfull.35514436_5deuiu2v0qgwkc4s88co

I have to share my latest thrift store score because I got some AWESOME items! It just goes to show you that you have to stay persistent and keep going back, even if you seem to have no luck.Β  After many trips finding nothing at all, I got all these great items that, after a little cleaning up, are some real treasures! Some repro enamelware, tea pots, a crock, and a very cool, vintage looking “Bird Watcher” sign! All will go to my booth at the Carriage Place!

DSC_0001

I got this other amazing group of antique medical items off of Craigslist. I can’t even tell you the incredible freakin low price I paid for this lot because you will literally die!!! I plan on keeping some items for my “oddities” collection, and selling the rest via Etsy and my co-op. They are all from a pharmacy in northern NY. All of the funnels, beakers and bottles are glass, and the mortars & pestles are cast iron and brass. Simply amazing.

DSC_0002

Have a GREAT Easter and happy pickin’ & craftin’!

Single Stem Vases

Happy St. Patrick’s Day to all my fellow Irishmen & women! πŸ™‚ Before I get to today’s craft project, I thought I’d share an update on the primitive crate shutter I made. I finally found a little pip berry wreath at my friend June’s antique store, and it was the perfect size to place right in the center of the shutter! Woohoo!

DSC_0455

I used some thin green floral wire to tie it on the shutter, sliding it between the slats of the crate boards, and securing on the back.

DSC_0456

I then used some jute twine, knotted through the pre-existing holes (from where nails held the crate pieces together) to make a hanger.

DSC_0457

It’s heading over to my co-op this week. I am putting $22 on it. It only cost a few bucks to make – the pip berry wreath being the only expense. The rest of the supplies were on hand, and I was able to re-use an old dilapidated crate that may have otherwise gone in the burn pile! πŸ™‚

DSC_0458

Ok, and not for the single stem bottles project. It’s a “dollar craft” because these awesome little bottles are only $1 at Michael’s craft store! The rest of the supplies I had on hand.

DSC_0441

You can accent the bottles with whatever you’d like! I decided to use rusty tin stars, little enamel number plates, and some skeleton keys. You could also use buttons, twine bows, little pip berry sprigs, faux berries or flowers, sea shells, antique broaches…be creative!

DSC_0443

Took a strip of torn homespun fabric and used a hot glue gun to secure it in place.

DSC_0444

Here are the finished bottles! They could be used for general decor or as single stem flower vases! πŸ™‚

DSC_0446

DSC_0452

I am going to price them at $4 each and see how it goes!

DSC_0454

And last but not least, some great thrift store finds! It’s quite a random collection of items, but cool nonetheless! I found a mint condition 1957 Chevy model car, a chunky primitive candle, a beautiful vintage brass and enamel bowl, and an old brass Eiffel Tower bottle opener!

DSC_0439

I also found a colorful enamel pot, a wooden wall decor/candle holder, and another little brass elf dude that I could not resist. Vintage brass seems to sell really well on Etsy and in te co-op.

DSC_0438

The major score of the trip was a bag of vintage brass horse buckles / tack medallions, in a variety of designs and shapes. I thought they were trivets at first, but upon further research I found that they are used to decorate horse tacks and bridles. They are collectible and are oh so cool!!! Some will go to the co-op and some on Etsy!

DSC_0433

DSC_0436

Hope everyone has a fantastic St. Patrick’s Day! Cheers! πŸ™‚

Previous Older Entries