Reversible Scarecrow & Snowman

I’m back! After a long crafting hiatus I decided to make something in honor of my favorite season approaching; also a project requested by a friend 🙂 . I haven’t had a lot of time or motivation over the last year so I do apologize for my lack of posts. It feels great to be back at it again. This is a popular one on Pinterest and I’m sure you’ve seen many variations of it. Here’s my take and the how-to!

First I bought the large wood piece already cut to this size at Lowe’s, and had the hat-brim pieces in my stock pile of wood. You can use any size for the brim depending on the look you’re going for; I opted for a chunky, large hat. I spray painted both sides of the board and the brims first, then nailed the brims down on either side so they mirror each other.

Here he is all painted, but I don’t like that real crisp, shiny look…

I like a little bit of a worn look so I did some sanding on the edges. I love these little sanding squares, and when they get all nasty and used up, I wrap a new piece of sand paper around it. Go for a large grit to work faster.

If I could find my frickin palm sander I probably would have done more overall sanding for a more rustic look, but since I was hand sanding and my arm was tired, I just got the edges.

Now it’s time for his face(s)! I perused Pinterest and got some ideas of the faces I like and don’t like, and decided on these. I like the simple eyes, the dotted mouth for the snowman, and the cross-hatched mouth for the scarecrow. Also, I HAD to have the candy corn nose!

For his rosy cheeks I used a little round foam brush. You could use any sponge, or just paint pink circles.

Incase you were wondering I used a black paint pen for the crisp lines, a yellow and orange paint pen for the noses, and white/red acrylic for the white accents and pink cheeks. Any ol’ acrylic paint would work, but I like the paint pens because they allow you to work with more precision, especially when outlining.

Now time for the hat accents. To start, I wrapped a piece of burlap ribbon all the way around and tied it in a bow on the scarecrow side. For the snowman I decided on some pip berries and a rusty star. Everything was secured with a hot glue gun.

For the scarecrow, some raffia and a large wooden button found at Michael’s. Both sides also got a little bow of homespun fabric for some color.

I also added “scarfs” by just ripping some strips of fabric and hot-gluing them in place, criss-crossing a bit.

I’m pretty happy with him overall, my only complaint being the hat seems a bit large for the face. Maybe next time I’ll use a skinnier brim.

Thanks to everyone for checking in and commenting over the last year. I hope to be back again soon with some new ideas! Hope everyone is enjoying the summer!!!!!!!!

Witch Hats

I’ve been feeling particularly Halloweenie lately, given all the Fall goodness that is out in the craft stores. I picked up these paper mache witch hats for $1.oo each at Michael’s and, with a little spray paint and hot glue, converted them into primitive style witch hat decorations. I think they came out pretty cute!

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Here’s the blank canvas.

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First, I spray painted them black. All I had was glossy paint on hand. I usually like to use a matte finish for projects like this. After it dried I sanded it, to make it look a little worn and prim.

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Next, I mixed up some orange acrylic paint with water, to make a really thin orange paint, which works best for splattering. I then used the messy, yet effective “splatter technique,” which is using your fingers to pull back the bristles of the brush and let the paint splatter paint over your surface.

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After it dried like this, I sprayed it with a satin clear coat, mainly to disguise the half glossy/half sanded look. Next time, I’d probably used a matte black paint so that it doesn’t look so funky after sanding.

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While that dried, I made some little tags to decorate the hats with.

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I trimmed the tags to make them a bit smaller and stamped out the words “The witch is in.”

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Next, use some homespun around the base of the hat. I hot glued it in place like this.

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Then I tied some raffia around the base of the hat and also hot glued it down in a few places, but also leaving it loose and flowing.

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I finished them off with some large vintage buttons that I tied on with the tags. I also put a dab of hot glue under them as well, for extra hold.

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Here they are all done. I am really pleased with them. They are heading over to my co-op today and I am thinking $14 each. I’ve never made anything like this before so not sure how they will sell. We’ll see!

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Happy Fall to all my craft friends out there!

Adding a Primitive Fall Look to Boring Ol’ Candles

Sometimes things that I think are really cute, will sit in my booth for years, and won’t sell. For example, I bought some small candles years ago, that came in awesome faux white enamel tubs and had a real farmhouse look to them. Though they’re old, they still smell awesome and I am not giving up on them! I have since made them over a few times, and I am hoping my new Fall spin on them will help them move off the shelves. Here’s the new country look and the how-to!

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Originally I tried to sell them as is, for like $3 a piece. Good deal, so I thought, but no one wanted them! 😦 Then as Christmas time came around, I packed them up in plastic bags, tied them with homespun, and added a cute rustic tag, for gift giving. I sold a few, but still have about 6 left. Here’s the “before.”

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My first step in making them over was to “primify” them. I put the broiler on and CAREFULLY watched them for about 1 minute while the tops softened up and smoothed out. After years of sitting around, the wax gets little scratches and nicks, so this process makes them look brand new again. I then shook on some ground cinnamon and let them cool. It gives them a rustic, dusty look, and of course smells great too! Please don’t burn your house down doing this. Don’t leave them unattended and please, be careful people!!!

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My first thought was to tie the burlap over the top and tie off with some twine. I guess I was envisioning more of a cheesecloth look, where you could see and smell the candle better. This just looked dumb. LOL. It also covered my cute, newly dusted candle tops that look so perfectly primitive!

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Take two. I used a plate as a guide to trace out circles of burlap that would fold up around the tubs, from the bottom.  This idea would look great on small jar candles (such as those in short, fat mason jars), so don’t worry if you love the look but can’t find these exact candles! Any jar candle would work!

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Put a ring of hot glue on the bottom of the jar candle and place on burlap. Then, using tiny dabs of hot glue, fold up the edges and create a taco-shell look. This will make it easier to tie on the twine.

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Tie it around once or twice and add more dabs of hot glue to hold up your burlap. I also trimmed and frayed the edges of my burlap during this part.

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For a little accent, I took a sprig of pip berries I had lying around and pulled off two sprigs for each candle.

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I curled up the ends of the sprigs by wrapping them around a little paint brush handle. Then I tied them on using the excess twine and finished it off with a little bow.

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I think I will throw in a free mason jar tag with each candle since they’d made nice Fall gifts. I got these mason jar tags at Target…8 for $1! I love them!

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They have a cool “scarecrow” feel with the frayed burlap. They’d be nice for any primitive home decor but will be especially nice for Fall time I think.

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My helper Fred takes a little snooze while I clean up. What a bum!

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Like I said, this look would be easy to create on regular jar candles as well. The cinnamon dusting is a super easy way to make something look “prim” too! What are your thoughts on the finished project? Anything you’d do differently? 🙂