Baseball Mason Jars

Hello crafty friends! Hope this post finds you safe and healthy! I was recently asked to make some baseball themed mason jars as gifts for the senior baseball Moms, since my brother-in-law is the coach. I jumped at the chance, because who doesn’t love mason jar crafts! I used short, fat mason jars that are going to have succulents planted in them. I thought I’d share the process since painting mason jars is a popular project these days and can be customized for pretty much any type of theme you want!

I started out with these short mason jars which can be bought just about anywhere. I got these at Wally world. If they are brand new jars, you are ready to start painting. If they are old jars or have been used before, it is a good idea to wipe them down with rubbing alcohol to remove any residue or oils. This helps the paint to adhere better.

The key to painting mason jars is getting the right kind of paint. Chalk paint works great and can be found any any craft store or place that sells paint. I used Kilz White Chalk paint also found at Wally world, which is AWESOME, but a bit pricey.

I ended up painting a total of 3 coats to make it an opaque white. Each coat should dry completely before you start the next coat. Give it at least a few hours between each coat.

When painting, it’s easiest to paint the rim first, and then go around and do the sides.

Next I used a paint pen to draw on the red baseball stitches. I have tried many types of paint pens and like this brand the best. I get better results with this than the Sharpie or ArtDeco brands, but that’s just my preference. Use what you like to work with!

First draw a circle like this:

And then do the tick marks all facing one direction like this.

Then do the same on the other side of the line, like a mirrored image of the stitch.

I did one side of all the jars first and let them dry, before proceeding to the other side!

When you do the stitches on the other sides, draw them pointing in the opposite direction. This is how a real baseball stitches are.

Once fully dry, spray them with a clear sealer. I used Aleene’s Matte Finish sealer. Spray lightly at first to make sure the red lines to do run. If it’s your first time making these, I always recommend having one “test” jar that you do each step on first, to make sure things are coming out the way you want them to. I did two full coats of sealer.

I added some twine around the top and tied in a bow. Raffia or ribbon would look great too. Maybe ribbon in the color of your favorite team. Customize them however you’d like!

I think they came out super cute and will make great gifts! What kinds of projects are you guys working on these days? Happy Spring! ๐Ÿ™‚

Country Snowman Mason Jars

Tis my favorite crafting time of the year…the season of painting SNOWMEN! They are easy, fun, and everyone loves them! I recently came across a new kind of paint that works great on glass surfaces, so I decided to try painting on some mason jars. The paint is DecoArt’s Americana Multi-Surface Satinย Acrylic. If you’ve tried painting on glass, you know it can be tricky. This stuff seems to have great coverage and “cures” after a few days, leaving a permanent finish. Here’s my finished product, and the how-to below!

This “looking up snowman” design is all over Pinterest, and I have been waiting to paint him forever! To get started, I did two coats of this pretty aqua color. Choose any color you want for the background. Coats were spaced about 3 hours apart. When applying the second coat, you risk “lifting” the first coat if it’s not completely dry. Unfortunately, patience is a must with this type of craft. A little tip; even after ample drying, try to apply the second coat quickly and lightly.

For the snowman head I decided to use a sponge stamper brush. This helps create the fuzzy edges of the head.

For the snow, I used the “splatter” technique. It’s pretty messy, but it works great! Put a little bit of paint in a bowl and water down just slightly. You want the paint to be a little thinner than how it comes in the bottle.

I protected the sink with some paper towels and went to town, flicking the paint brush at the jar to create the speckled snow look.

Once the heads were dry, I went on the paint the noses, rosy cheeks, and black dots for the mouth. Here’s an example of the “lifting” I was mentioning earlier. I was trying to fix one of the rosy cheeks and was painting the same little area over and over, and pressed a bit too hard. It pulled off all of the layers of paint in that area. Unfortunately it is hard to repair these types of paint tears without being super obvious….so I decided to scrap this jar.

I also added the big snowflake above his head, and a few larger white dots of snow. I’m so happy with how they turned out! The paint will cure after 4 days, or can be baked (directions on back of paint bottle). I chose to let them cure by air drying. According to the paint instructions there is no need for a final clear sealer!

After curing, I added a piece of twine and a rustic snowflake. I happened to have these on hand, but you could also little jingle bells, some pip berries, or other rusty shapes. Even just a little jute or homespun bow would be cute too!

You could put a tea light in the jar, or fill them with holiday treats! I will be giving these out as gifts stuffed with candy. As always, thank you for reading, and I hope you all are enjoying all the fun crafts that comes along with the holiday season! ๐Ÿ™‚

Mason Jar Soap Dispensers

I’ve seen them online and in gift shops for years, and decided it’s time to try making some of my own mason jar soap dispensers! They are easy, fun, cheap to make, and would make great gifts for the upcoming holiday season. You can Google a million different ways to make them, but here’s how I did it. ๐Ÿ™‚

DSC_0042

First gather your supplies. You’ll need mason jars with lids, soap dispensers, and some kind of glue or sealant. I got soaps with standard pumps for $1 at the Family Dollar. Clean off the pumps and then you can use the soap in your jars when you’re done!

DSC_0016

DSC_0023

Along with using regular mason jar lids, I found these fun gingham jar lids at Target, in the dollar bins! They were made for mason jar drinking cups (with small holes for straws) but I knew I could drill bigger holes and use them for the soap dispensers.

DSC_0005

I had Greg drill holes in the lids using a large drill bit.ย  Our biggest bit was a little too small for the soap dispensers to slide in, so he had to rock the drill back and forth, and press on the sides of the hole and widen it just a little bit. Don’t be intimidated by this part – the drill popped through the lid without too much effort. You could also use a hammer to poke a hole in the top using a screw driver and just pry open the hole by hand. Just be careful not to cut yourself on the sharp edges.

DSC_0011

DSC_0013

DSC_0022

DSC_0021

Slide in the soap dispenser piece and seal the under side with some sort of waterproof glue. In this case, the dispenser fit pretty snug, which worked great to hold them in place while the glue dried. If they are loose, you’ll have to prop them up to hold the dispenser upright while it dries.

DSC_0032

I used this waterproof silicone sealant because I had it on hand. Let it dry completely – this sealant took 24 hours to cure.

DSC_0027

And that’s pretty much it! Finish off your jars with whatever kinds of accents you feel like. I went with homespun ties and twine bows. I had a few mason jars on hand, but I also picked up these cool purple “vintage style” jars at Tractor Supply on clearance! I knew they’d eventually come in handy! ๐Ÿ˜€

DSC_0039

DSC_0036

After looking at many ideas on Pinterest, I discovered you can use these dispensers for a variety of things…condiments (think ketchup and mustard), hand lotion, dish soap or detergent, hand sanitizer, and more! I’m definitely thinking I will make some for Christmas gifts this year! ๐Ÿ™‚